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John Barber August 2015 Mission Newsletter

COVENANT GROWS

Covenant College of Theological Studies and Leadership in Kenya continues to grow. The student body is now at 36 and the school maintains 50% self-support through tuition and fees. The story of Covenant is one of faithfulness: God’s faithfulness to a small group of leaders who believed the Lord desired rigorous biblical and theological training for those already in ministry, and also for those yet to enter pastoral ministry. I feel very blessed to have played a role in starting this school in 2010. This coming November, eleven more men will graduate with B.A. in Theology in conjunction with New Geneva Theological Seminary.

Students Covenant College of Kenya August 2015

PROPOSED NEED

Currently the school is still meeting in Nakuru Kenya, but for practical reasons must return to Nairobi. That will require the purchase of land and the erection of buildings to house classrooms and other facilities. Please pray how you might lend a hand toward this end. A positive is that the U.S. dollar is very strong in Kenya and a little goes a very long way. Any offering of support to the school will greatly help Covenant’s future plans.


IMMEDIATE NEED

The graduation ceremony in November will incure costs the school cannot raise through student fees. If you can send a small donation (as low as $10) to EPI in the name of Covenant, that will help ensure the graduation.

VISION FOR NEW BIBLE COLLEGE IN THE DRC

In May of 2014, I was blessed to travel to the DRC. Bukava, Congo is situated on Lake Kivu and provides a splendid setting for Bible classes. Much more than this however, the conference with about70 pastors and area leaders, sparked overwhelming interest in core biblical doctrines that many of us take for granted.


I still vividly recall the mini-revival that broke out over my simple explanation of the “indicative-imperative” of Scripture. After the room settled, participants literally demanded my return for the purpose of exploring the possibility of establishing a Bible College in Congo, one similar to Covenant College of Theological Studies in Kenya. 

Congo conference 2014

My plan is to teach a course on Christianity and culture in Uganda this coming Fall, and after that, to travel to the DRC to conduct another conference, but this time one that will also function as an experimental college class. Students will be given written assignments, etc. Progress will be tracked and evaluated. Based upon my evaluation of class performance the feasibility of a college will be sustained.

Frankly, I believe that this formal step will indeed lead to the birth of a school. Of course, the future of such an educational institution in Congo is up to the Lord. 

ADDITIONAL PLANS

I hope to return with Dr. Dominic Aquila and Rev. Jim Fitzgerald to teach at the New Geneva Theological Seminary extensions in Tunisia and Egypt. I was privileged to teach Presuppositional Apologetics to many pastors and students in March of 2014.

On a personal note, since October of 2014, I have suffered some rather intense back issues. Those problems have curtailed some travel, although I was able to conduct a conference in South Africa last May. I can only ask for your prayer that God will give strength where I have none. Each day I learn that his grace is sufficient.

BOOK RELEASE

Whitefield Media is about to release a book I have written on the world-renowned theologian, John M. Frame. It is titled, One Kingdom: The Practical Theology of John M. Frame. It is a bit academic, still, I hope you will check it out on Amazon when it is released early September. You can expect an email notifying you of the book’s release.

Thanks for your continued prayer and financial support which can be sent to the address below. Make your check to EPI and note it “John Barber.” If your check is for Covenant College please make it to EPI but note it for “Covenant College.” In His fields!

EPI, 8007 Waterglow Court, Orlando, FL., 32817. 

Comments

  1. This is great news John! Praying for the College in Kenya and the founding of another College. May God bless this missionary work.

    ReplyDelete

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